Saturday, January 14, 2012

42mm Toy Soldiers

One of my regular painting clients makes his own wooden toy soldiers. These are roughly 42mm figures and he sent me a batch to try painting.

These fellows represent a militia unit thus their uniforms are... errr... not uniform. Beyond blue coats and not too uniform, I was left to my own devices with a sample figure.

These were an interesting painting challenge. There are relatively few features to the figure so much was painted free hand. Also, the surfaces involved are huge, in the context of most toy soldiers. I had to find some larger brushes in my collection to get decent coverage. These took roughly three times what 15mm figure would take, but I'm guessing I could get the time down with some practice.

Although the figures look simple, there is a surprising amount of detail to paint. The faces took me a while to figure out. Some of the jackets were prepainted with what I think is an oil paint which did not play nicely with my acrylic cross belts. But in the end they turned out alright.

My daughter quite likes these. They have a quaint, throwback feel to them. I cannot believe Dale hand-made each one. The arms are fun felt but the rest is wooden.

Up next: Some 15mm WW2 Germans are crying out for paint. With the weather about to turn cold, I expect should have them done this week. I also have some 6mm Naps I need to prime. Then back to my own projects with trees and perhaps some 1/72 AWI British in the offing.

6 comments:

  1. I like them..they have a charm not achievable with "normal" sculpts. You´ve given them a great paintjob
    Cheers
    paul

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  2. Thanks Paul. You should see the ones Dale has done on his website--amazing look to them!

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  3. Yeah, I am really looking forward to getting these guys home! They look great and they will finally give me something other than British for my French to skirmish with. Next up, either the "28mm" wooden Imperial Roman DBA army I started but never finished or some Prussian Landwehr Lancer cavalry to go with these guys. Decisions, decisions...

    Yeah, big brushes help, but that was not oil paints on the coats; it was acrylic. Mostly GW foundation paints. Just remember that wood is more porous than pewter (or styrene), so it sucks up the paint and changes the "feel" of the surface.

    Strange that the one lost its base.

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